vegetarian | The Jewish Week | Food & Wine

vegetarian

Green Herb and Kidney Bean Stew

Green Herb and Kidney Bean Stew (Sara Remington)

Green Herb and Kidney Bean Stew

Citrus-Marinated Halibut with Mango Salsa

Citrus-Marinated Halibut with Mango Salsa (Ellen Silverman)

Citrus-Marinated Halibut with Mango Salsa

I use this marinade year-round on whatever fish is best in the market, but I especially like to pair it with halibut in the winter. The marinade’s bright combination of fresh lemon and orange juice, made still more piquant with a little hot pepper, is exactly right when skies are heavy and dull. The marinade is a twofer: First it’s used to flavor and lightly moisten the fish, and then it’s heated and drizzled over the pan-roasted fillets.

Pink Pickled Turnips

Pink pickled turnips (Sonya Sanford/JTA)

Pink Pickled Turnips

This article originally appeared on The Nosher.

Braised Cabbage Russian Piroshki Pastries

Piroshki (Sonya Sanford/The Nosher via JTA)

Braised Cabbage Russian Piroshki Pastries

This article originally appeared on The Nosher via JTA.

White Bean & Zucchini Burger

White Bean & Zucchini Burger (Photographs © The Experiment, 2016)

White Bean & Zucchini Burger

Veggie burgers from a box have always let me down. They usually have a rubbery texture and cardboard taste, which is why I prefer homemade veggie burgers. This recipe is super-easy to make with ingredients that won’t break the bank, and it allows for so many possibilities. Use a bun or lettuce wrap, or do I as do: Eat them as is, topped with a spread such as Dijon mustard and a side of roasted veggies.

Pomegranate Roasted Carrots with Sumac

Pomegranate roasted carrots with sumac (Leanne Shor/The Nosher/JTA)

Pomegranate Roasted Carrots with Sumac

This article originally appeared on The Nosher.

Roasting vegetables is one of the easiest ways to prepare vegetables, not to mention the most delicious. Roasting at a high heat caramelizes veggies, creating such an amazing depth of flavor and natural sweetness that I find completely addictive.

Cabbage Schnitzel

Cabbage schnitzel (Sonya Sanford) Via JTA

Cabbage Schnitzel

This article originally appeared on The Nosher.

Schnitzel is one of the ultimate comfort foods. It’s hard not to like a food that is fried and golden brown. Schnitzel is commonly made from chicken or veal, but you’ll also find vegetarian versions made from celery root or, in this case, cabbage.

Georgian-Style Stuffed Tomatoes

Georgian-Style Stuffed Tomatoes (The Nosher)

Georgian-Style Stuffed Tomatoes

(The Nosher) – There can never be too many tomatoes. August’s heat is always made more bearable for me by peak tomato season. I love to eat them cut into thick rounds and topped on crusty well-buttered toasted bread, or chopped small in a simple Israeli salad alongside cucumber and herbs. By this time of year, I end up with way more tomatoes from the garden and the market than I could possibly use up in sandwiches and salads alone.

Vegetarian Mushroom Moussaka

Vegetarian Mushroom Moussaka (The Nosher via JTA)

Vegetarian Mushroom Moussaka

(The Nosher via JTA) – Greek Jews are no strangers to moussaka, the rich casserole traditionally made from eggplant and lamb and thickly layered with bechamel. But because kosher laws prohibit the consumption of milk and meat together, Jewish versions of the dish tend to either skip the bechamel , which is a shame flavorwise, or make a dairy-free topping from fat, flour and stock.

During the meat-free Nine Days leading up to Tisha B’av, it may seem unusual to talk about delicious food, but in my family, feasting on vegetarian, fish, and dairy meals is something we actually look forward to. At this time of year, when the weather is oppressively hot and humid, eating meat feels more like a burden than a pleasure. My seasonal go-to meals are often salads made with whole grains.