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vegetarian

Georgian-Style Stuffed Tomatoes

Georgian-Style Stuffed Tomatoes (The Nosher)

Georgian-Style Stuffed Tomatoes

(The Nosher) – There can never be too many tomatoes. August’s heat is always made more bearable for me by peak tomato season. I love to eat them cut into thick rounds and topped on crusty well-buttered toasted bread, or chopped small in a simple Israeli salad alongside cucumber and herbs. By this time of year, I end up with way more tomatoes from the garden and the market than I could possibly use up in sandwiches and salads alone.

Vegetarian Mushroom Moussaka

Vegetarian Mushroom Moussaka (The Nosher via JTA)

Vegetarian Mushroom Moussaka

(The Nosher via JTA) – Greek Jews are no strangers to moussaka, the rich casserole traditionally made from eggplant and lamb and thickly layered with bechamel. But because kosher laws prohibit the consumption of milk and meat together, Jewish versions of the dish tend to either skip the bechamel , which is a shame flavorwise, or make a dairy-free topping from fat, flour and stock.

During the meat-free Nine Days leading up to Tisha B’av, it may seem unusual to talk about delicious food, but in my family, feasting on vegetarian, fish, and dairy meals is something we actually look forward to. At this time of year, when the weather is oppressively hot and humid, eating meat feels more like a burden than a pleasure. My seasonal go-to meals are often salads made with whole grains.

Kamut (or Whole Grain of choice) with Carrots, Tomatoes, Egg, Herbs

Kamut (or Whole Grain of choice) with Carrots, Tomatoes, Egg, Herbs

Fennel Parmigiana

Fennel Parmigiana/ Mowie Kay

Fennel Parmigiana

For this dish, which is traditionally served for Shavuot, fennel is steamed then lightly fried in butter, topped with grated parmesan and baked in the oven until the top is lightly browned.

Vegetable Gratin

Vegetable Gratin for Shavuot/ Mowie Kay

Vegetable Gratin

This delicious gratin from Provence consists of layers of courgettes (zucchini), aubergines (eggplants), onions, tomato sauce and grated cheese. If you like, you can fry the courgette and aubergine slices, but I prefer to grill (broil) them, as this uses less oil.

Sephardic Cheese and Parsley Pastries

Sephardic Cheese and Parsley Pastries/ Mowie Kay

Sephardic Cheese and Parsley Pastries

These delicious little pastries are traditionally served for the Sabbath brunch and for Shavuot, but they are also very good with aperitifs. Nigella seeds add a spicy, almost onion-like flavor. Any other filling for Sephardic pastries in this book, such as bulemas, pastels or filas, can be used to make borekitas.

Cumin Chickpea Tacos

Sara Haas' Cumin Chickpea Tacos

Cumin Chickpea Tacos

Falafel Stuffed Eggplant

Falafel Stuffed Eggplant

Israeli food has become very popular across the globe. My family loves it, so I often test all kinds of recipes on them and get their feedback when I experiment with new varieties of Israeli cuisine. Stuffed eggplants in particular have been appearing in cookbooks, magazines and blogs in the last few years. The eggplant is usually stuffed with beef or lamb, but I wanted to try a vegetarian version. This eggplant dish was inspired by my love of falafel, and my family really enjoyed it.

Rigatoni with Lentil Bolognese

Rigatoni with Lentil Bolognese/ Vicky Cohen/Ruth Fox

Rigatoni with Lentil Bolognese