May We Recommend: Peach Cobbler | The Jewish Week | Food & Wine

May We Recommend: Peach Cobbler

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Fresh fruit cobblers and crisps sing of summer. The most popular are peach and fresh blackberries or blueberries but any fruit works, and in the Fall, nothing beats a cinnamon- apple cobbler.

This dessert has several variations. In Tennessee, I grew up eating a traditional cobbler which is fruit with a sweet biscuit topping baked in an oven. Its cousin is the slump or grunt. For this variation, the dessert is cooked on a stovetop in a covered skillet. The name “slump” describes how the fruit bubbles up over the topping and softens it creating fruit and dough crevasses.

My husband grew up in New York eating peach crisp, referred to as a crumble in England. The topping is oats or other cereal (we also use Grape Nuts) mixed with cinnamon, brown sugar, and butter. Crisps can be cooked on a stovetop or in an oven.

No matter which version you choose to make, start by using very ripe fruit, preferably from a local orchard and organic. Most peaches sold in supermarkets are stickered with their place of origin. A quick Google search found several orchards that direct ship. I am partial to sweet Georgia peaches, but my local Hudson Valley orchard, Jenkin-Luekins, grows some pretty amazing varieties.

Peaches continue to ripen after being picked. Here are some buying tips:

  • Color: Look for golden yellow-orange peaches with no green hues. Redness is more indicative to a style of peach and not a sign of ripeness.
  • Touch: Press the peach tip gently. If it gives, the fruit is ripe or nearly so.
  • Texture: Slight shriveling means the peach is ripe.
  • Aroma: A ripe peach smells peachy-fresh.
  • Place nearly ripe peaches in a brown paper back for two to three days to continue ripening.

Fresh Peach Cobbler

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