Baked Shakshuka | The Jewish Week | Food & Wine

Baked Shakshuka

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Baked Shakshuka

(The Nosher via JTA) – I think we can all agree that shakshuka is probably one of the greatest dishes ever created. It’s easy, simple and you can usually make it from stuff you already have in the house: canned tomatoes, spices and eggs. You can add vegetables like roasted eggplant, fresh (or frozen) spinach or cheese like feta or goat cheese.

It’s also versatile in terms of size: You can make a small portion or a much larger one.

Shakshuka for a crowd is ideal for brunch entertaining. Serve it up with some labne, hummus, chopped Israeli salad and fresh pita or other good bread for dipping.

Servings & Times
Yield:
  • 6 servings
Active Time:
  • 1 hr
Ingredients

2 tablespoons olive oil
1 large onion
4 garlic cloves
1 12-ounce jar roasted red peppers, drained and chopped (can also use freshly roasted peppers, skin removed and chopped)
2 28-ounce cans diced tomatoes
1 tablespoon paprika
2 teaspoons cumin
1/2 teaspoon caraway seeds
salt and pepper to taste
6-8 eggs
2-4 ounces feta cheese
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
pita or fresh bread for serving

Steps
  1. Preheat oven to 375 F. Grease a 9-by-11 Pyrex dish.
  2. Add oil to a large saute pan (pan should be a little on the deeper side) over medium heat. Add onion and cook for 4-5 minutes, until soft and translucent. Add garlic and cook 1 minute. Add roasted bell pepper and spices and continue to cook for 3-4 minutes, until fragrant.
  3. Scrape mixture into greased Pyrex dish. Add the 2 cans of diced tomatoes and mix.
  4. Place in oven for 30-35 minutes, until sauce has thickened slightly and tomatoes are cooked.
  5. Carefully remove pan from oven. Using a tablespoon, create 6-8 wells in the tomato sauce. Crack eggs and gently place in each well.
  6. Place pan back into oven for 3-5 minutes, or until whites have just set and egg yolks are still runny. (Or to your liking).
  7. Remove from oven. Sprinkle with feta cheese (optional) and fresh parsley. Serve hot with fresh pita or bread.

(Shannon Sarna is the editor of The Nosher.)

The Nosher food blog offers a dazzling array of new and classic Jewish recipes and food news, from Europe to Yemen, from challah to shakshuka and beyond. Check it out at www.TheNosher.com.