Instead of Bagels and Lox, Break the Fast with Candied Eggplant | The Jewish Week | Food & Wine

Instead of Bagels and Lox, Break the Fast with Candied Eggplant

Instead of Bagels and Lox, Break the Fast with Candied Eggplant

Courtesy Joyce Goldstein

Yom Kippur Break-Fast Recipes from Jews of the Mediterranean 

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While bagels, cream cheese, and lox are the de rigeur Yom Kippur break- fast menu items for American Ashkenazi Jews, as Joyce Goldstein highlights in her latest cookbook, The New Mediterranean Jewish Table, many Sephardi, Maghrebi, and Mizrahi Jews turn to sweetened, prepared vegetables and creamy rice pudding to replenish after the fast. 

Goldstein is the former chef and owner of San Francisco's Square One restaurant and former chef at Chez Panisse. The New Mediterranean Jewish Table is the product of her intense study of the foods eaten by the Jews of the Mediterranean and she accompanies many of the over 400 recipes with historical tidbits. Goldstein is interested in exposing North American home cooks to the food traditions of Jews from North Africa, Italy, Greece, Turkey, Spain, Portugal, and the Middle East.

The recipes are largely vegetable- centric and seasonally driven. "Although cooking with seasonal, local food is often characterized as a new trend," Goldstein writes in the introduction to The New Mediterranean Jewish Table, "in the Mediterranean kitchen of generations past, ingredients were always locally grown, seasonal, and unadulterated."

Candied Eggplant "Confit D'aubergines":


Melted Golden Squash "Zucca Disfatta":


Cream of Rice Pudding "Sutlatch"​:

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